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Four Corners Monument
Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah.
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October 12, 2011

George and Eve DeLange

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Four Corners Monument. Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah. Hikes, Travels, & Tours. Photos, Pictures, Images, & Reviews.
Four Corners Monument. Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah.
Eve DeLange At Four Corners Monument. Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah. Hikes, Travels, & Tours. Photos, Pictures, Images, & Reviews.
Eve DeLange Standing In Four States At One Time.
Four Corners Monument. Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah.
Eve DeLange At Four Corners Monument. Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah. Hikes, Travels, & Tours. Photos, Pictures, Images, & Reviews.
Eve DeLange At Four Corners Monument. Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah.

Four Corners Monument:

We wish to thank Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia for some of the information on this page. We share information with Wikipedia.

The Four Corners Monument marks the quadripoint in the Southwestern United States where the states of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah meet. It is the only point in the United States shared by four states, leading to this area being called the Four Corners region. The monument also marks the boundary between two semi-autonomous native American governments, the Navajo Nation, which maintains the monument as a tourist attraction, and the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe Reservation.

The origins of the state boundaries marked by the monument occurred during the American Civil War, when the United States Congress acted to form governments in the area to combat Confederate ambitions for the region. Claims are sometimes made that the monument was misplaced in the initial surveys. The accuracy of the surveys has been defended by the U.S. National Geodetic Survey and the monument has been legally established as the corner of the four states.

However, in 2009, a spokesperson for the U.S. National Geodetic Survey admitted the monument is placed 1,807 feet east of where modern surveyors would mark the point. Duh!!!!!

Note: This is not a national monument. It is maintained by the Navajo Nation and under their laws. Not the US Government.

The monument where "visitors can simultaneously straddle the territory of four states" is maintained as a tourist attraction by the Navajo Nation Parks and Recreation Department. It is an example of a political boundary as a tourist destination for the sake of itself. Tourists "love" to stand in the middle of the monument and be in four states at one time.

The monument consists of a granite disk embedded with a smaller bronze disk around the point, surrounded by smaller, appropriately located state seals and flags representing both the states and tribal nations of the area. Circling the point, with two words in each state, the disk reads, "Four states here meet in freedom under God."

Around the monument, local Navajo and Ute artisans sell souvenirs and food. An admission fee is required to view and photograph the monument.

The monument is a popular tourist attraction despite its remote and isolated location. It has become somewhat of a phenomenon for people to travel long distances to take pictures of family and friends at the monument in Twister-like poses, sitting on the disk, in a circle of friends or family around the disk, or for couples to kiss directly over the disk.


The monument is located on the Colorado Plateau west of U.S. Highway 160, approximately 40 miles southwest of Cortez, Colorado. The monument is centered at 36°59'56.31532?N 109°02'42.62019?W.

This area, now called Four Corners, was governed by Mexico following its independence from Spain, until being ceded to the United States by the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848. The location of the Four Corners Monument was effectively set in 1861 as the southwest corner of the Colorado Territory by the 36th United States Congress. Congress transferred land previously allocated to the Utah Territory by declaring the boundary of Colorado to be the 32nd meridian west from Washington. This line was derived from the reference used at the time, the Washington meridian.

In 1861, in the midst of the American Civil War, a group of people in the southern portion of New Mexico Territory passed a resolution condemning the United States for creating a vast territory with only a single, small government in place at Santa Fe. They claimed by doing so the U.S. had ignored the needs of the southern portion, left them without a functional system of law and order, and allowed the situation to deteriorate into a state of chaos and near anarchy. The group declared secession from the United States and announced their intent to join the Confederate States of America under the name of the Arizona Territory.

The U.S. Congress responded in 1863 by creating another Arizona Territory with different, but partially overlapping boundaries. The Confederate boundaries split New Mexico along an east–west line, the 34th parallel north, allowing for a single state connection from Texas to the Colorado River. This would give the Confederacy access to California and the Pacific coast. The Union definition split New Mexico along a north–south line, extending the boundaries established for Colorado. This created the quadripoint at the modern Four Corners – with two territories separating California from Texas. After the split, New Mexico resembled its modern form, with slight differences.

After the Civil War, efforts began to survey and create states from the earlier territories. The first survey of the line was made by E. N. Darling in 1868, and marked with a sandstone marker.

Another survey was completed in 1875 by Chandler Robbins, at which time the marker was moved to its current location. The results of this survey were later accepted as the legal boundary when states were established from the earlier territories. The first permanent marker was placed at the site in 1912.

The first modern Navajo government convened in 1923 in an effort to organize and regulate an increasing amount of oil exploration activities on Navajo lands. A bronze disk was placed at the spot in 1931. The Navajo Nation has since assumed the monument, pouring a concrete pad and other site improvements during the 1960s. The monument was completely rebuilt in 1992, and again in 2010.

If you are planning to visit Four Corners Monument, you will need to fly into a local international airport and then catch a regional flight to the Four Corners Regional Airport (FMN / KFMN). This airport has domestic flights from Farmington, New Mexico and is about 25 miles from the center of Shiprock, NM. Then you could rent a car.

We recommend visiting Four Corners Monument when also traveling by car to another major city in the Four Corners Area.


There are many hotels and motels in the various cities located within about a hundred miles of the Four Corners Area, and if you need a place to stay; Priceline.com can arrange that for you.

We have personally, booked flights, hotels, and vacations; through Priceline.com and we can highly recommend them. Their website is also easy to use!

We have some links to Priceline.com on this page since they can arrange all of your air flights, hotels and car.

We also have some links to Altrec.com on this page since they are a good online source for any outdoor camping gear and clothing that you may need.

We of course, appreciate your use of the advertising on our pages, since it helps us to keep our pages active.

Whenever you make a purchase from a link on our page we get credit for that transaction. Again, Thanks!

Four Corners Monument. Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah. Hikes, Travels, & Tours. Photos, Pictures, Images, & Reviews.Four Corners Monument. Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah. Hikes, Travels, & Tours. Photos, Pictures, Images,& Reviews.
Four Corners Monument.
Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah.
Four Corners Monument.
Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah.

Free Breakfast with IHG Hotels.


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